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(Source: bitchsass, via backdoorteenmom)

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nhlredwings:

Classic Miller Face

nhlredwings:

Classic Miller Face

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(Source: goojiras, via foxnewsofficial)

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ucsdhealthsciences:

The awe of similars
Cilia are typically tiny, even microscopic, protruberances. They are hairlike – derived in fact from the Latin word for eyelash – but far more complicated, found abundantly throughout nature doing many kinds of jobs.
There are two types: motile and non-motile. The former are employed as a form of locomotion, with groups of cilia undulating in coordinated waves as a method of transportation. Non-motile or primary cilia behave as sensory organelles. Humans feature both types.
Motile cilia, for example, are found in the lining of the trachea, where they sweep mucus and dirt out of the lungs and in the Fallopian tubes, where their rhythmic beating moves the egg from the ovum to the uterus.
Virtually every cell in the human body sports at least one primary cilium, used by the cell to take measure of its surroundings. For some cilia, such as those in the ear or lining the nasal cavity, this job is particularly notable. They are essential elements of our sensory processes.
The images above: Top left, a false-colored scanning electron micrograph of cilia in a human Fallopian tube, courtesy of Steven Gschmeissner; top right, nasal cilia, courtesy of Susumu Nishinaga; lower left, an immature hair bundle of cells in the cochlea of the human ear, courtesy of David Furness, Wellcome Images; and lower right, cilia lining the trachea, courtesy again of Gschmeissner.

ucsdhealthsciences:

The awe of similars

Cilia are typically tiny, even microscopic, protruberances. They are hairlike – derived in fact from the Latin word for eyelash – but far more complicated, found abundantly throughout nature doing many kinds of jobs.

There are two types: motile and non-motile. The former are employed as a form of locomotion, with groups of cilia undulating in coordinated waves as a method of transportation. Non-motile or primary cilia behave as sensory organelles. Humans feature both types.

Motile cilia, for example, are found in the lining of the trachea, where they sweep mucus and dirt out of the lungs and in the Fallopian tubes, where their rhythmic beating moves the egg from the ovum to the uterus.

Virtually every cell in the human body sports at least one primary cilium, used by the cell to take measure of its surroundings. For some cilia, such as those in the ear or lining the nasal cavity, this job is particularly notable. They are essential elements of our sensory processes.

The images above: Top left, a false-colored scanning electron micrograph of cilia in a human Fallopian tube, courtesy of Steven Gschmeissner; top right, nasal cilia, courtesy of Susumu Nishinaga; lower left, an immature hair bundle of cells in the cochlea of the human ear, courtesy of David Furness, Wellcome Images; and lower right, cilia lining the trachea, courtesy again of Gschmeissner.

(via aspiringdoctors)

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crosby-juice:

omg Erik made the log in page. iconic 

crosby-juice:

omg Erik made the log in page. iconic 

(via kronwalldo)

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egax:

I have been saving this since last year. Happy Earth Day everyone.

egax:

I have been saving this since last year. Happy Earth Day everyone.

(via storgebeaute)

Tags: earth day
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videohall:

Greyhound being read a scary story

(via socialnetworkhell)

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everybody-loves-to-eat:

Knuckle Sandwich by Renée S. Suen on Flickr.
($9/roll) – pork knuckle and ham hock terrine that’s been pressed and coated with panko crumbs then deep fried, and served in a Kaiser roll with spicy broccoli rabe, grainy mustard, and the restaurant’s home-style red sauce (sauce made from san marzano tomatoes). Available as a hero sandwich ($12) or in platter form ($17) that’s served with sides.

everybody-loves-to-eat:

Knuckle Sandwich by Renée S. Suen on Flickr.

($9/roll) – pork knuckle and ham hock terrine that’s been pressed and coated with panko crumbs then deep fried, and served in a Kaiser roll with spicy broccoli rabe, grainy mustard, and the restaurant’s home-style red sauce (sauce made from san marzano tomatoes). Available as a hero sandwich ($12) or in platter form ($17) that’s served with sides.

Tags: sandwich
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sandwichsnob asked: Ship me with a DRW player. Please and thank you.

tomas-tatar:

You with Nyquist oh yea babeeee

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One of many regrets (something I’ve never told anyone)

When I was 7 years old, I went to the hospital with my parents to visit my father’s coworker. The man was a good friend of my father’s and he had a heart attack that would lead to a coronary bypass surgery.

We walked through the halls and passed by the pediatrics department. There was a little girl, about my age, playing in common area. She looked very ill and was hooked up to an IV pump but she still had enough energy to push a car around a track. We made eye contact and she smiled at me. As I continued to stare at her, she beckoned for me to come in and join her. I looked away and continued down the hall with my parents. 

After we visited my father’s coworker, we passed by the room with the girl. She waved and motioned for me to come in again. I didn’t. I was terrified of her. I shook my head “no” and she stuck her tongue at me. Then she plopped down on the floor with a solemn expression.

A few weeks later, my father’s coworker returned to work. My father took the man out to lunch to welcome him back. A few hours after that lunch, he called the man into his office and fired him. Not longer after that, the man had another heart attack.

I wonder if my father ever regretted firing his friend as much as I regretted ignoring that little girl

Tags: personal
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fukkkres:

yungterra:

rare

he need to come kick it forreal

(via socialnetworkhell)

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pleasedotheneedful:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

fMRI strikes again

(via aspiringdoctors)

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nobody-22:

Well.. Jesus just got escorted out of the Boston - Detroit game…. He’ll be back in three days.

nobody-22:

Well.. Jesus just got escorted out of the Boston - Detroit game…. He’ll be back in three days.

(Source: reddit.com)

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Happy Easter, everyone!

Happy Easter, everyone!

(via backdoorteenmom)